Public Reporting Data

Public Reporting Data

Dell Children’s compares ourselves on a number of hospital-acquired conditions to a network of 135+ children’s hospitals called Solutions for Patient Safety, who share the vision that no child will ever experience serious harm while we are trying to heal them.

Dell Children’s also participates in American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric ( ACS NSQIP-P). NSQIP-P provides hospitals with high-quality surgical outcomes data and methods to improve care.

The Dell Children’s surgery program is verified by the American College of Surgeon Children’s Surgery Verification Quality Improvement Program (ACS CSV). The goal of ACS CSV is to ensure pediatric surgical patients have access to high-quality care. The CSV program defines the resources required to achieve optimal patient outcomes for children receiving surgical care.

Infections in the blood

If a patient is in the hospital, a central line (tube inserted into the body to deliver primarily medications) may be put in. Patients with a central line are at high risk of developing dangerous blood infections. These blood infections can lead to other complications and may lead to death. Lower number equals better performance.
For January 2020-October 2020, Dell Children’s average blood infection rate was .325, compared to an average of 1.26 for the Solutions for Patient Safety children’s hospitals. Dell Children’s is performing better than our comparison group.
This number represents the number of times patients experienced a blood infection from a central line per 1000 catheter days. A catheter day is counted each day a patient is in the hospital with a catheter present, for each patient in the hospital with a catheter. One patient in the hospital for 15 days with a catheter present would equal 15 catheter days.

Infections in the urine

If a patient is in the hospital, he or she may require a urinary catheter (tube inserted into the urethra to measure the amount of urine the patient is making or to give medications to the bladder). Patients with urinary catheters are at risk of developing dangerous urinary tract infections. These can lead to other complications and may lead to death. Lower number equals better performance.
For January 2020-October 2020, Dell Children’s average urinary tract infection rate was .00, compared to an average of 1.26 for the Solutions for Patient Safety children’s hospitals. Dell Children’s is performing better than our comparison group.
This number represents the number of times patients experienced a urinary infection from a urinary catheter per 1000 urinary catheter days. A urinary catheter day is counted each day a patient is in the hospital with a urinary catheter present, for each patient in the hospital with a urinary catheter. One patient in the hospital for 15 days with a urinary catheter present would equal 15 urinary catheter days.

Infections related to surgery

These infections happen after surgery in the area of the body where the surgery took place. These infections can be very serious, and may spread throughout the patient’s body, which can lead to a longer recovery time and may lead to death if not treated.
For January 2020-September 2021, Dell Children’s average surgical site infection rate was 2.19, compared to an average of 2.07 for the Solutions for Patient Safety children’s hospitals. Dell Children’s is performing slightly worse than our comparison group.
This number represents the number of times patients experienced post-surgery infection per 1000 surgical procedures.

Dangerous bed sores

A bed sore is a sore or wound on the skin that forms typically when a patient has a medical device that is not padded or repositioned. Occasionally these occur related to being unable to turn or tilt a  patient. Advanced bed sores (also known as stage 3, stage 4, or unstageable pressure injuries) can become large and very deep, reaching the muscle or bone, leading to severe pain and serious infection. This can lead to a longer hospital stay, or even death.
For January 2020-November 2020, Dell Children’s average bed sore (pressure injury) rate for advanced bed sores was .104, compared to an average of .107 for the Solutions for Patient Safety children’s hospitals. Dell Children’s is performing slightly better than the comparison group.
This number represents the number of times patients experienced stage 3, stage 4, or unstageable bed sores (pressure injuries) per 1000 patient days. A patient day is counted each day a patient is in the hospital, for each patient in the hospital, for the duration of their hospital stay. One patient in the hospital for 15 days would equal 15 patient days.

Patient falls with injuries

Patients may face serious injury from a fall while in the hospital. Falls can happen when patients who really cannot walk on their own try getting out of the bed to go to the bathroom. Patient falls with injuries can increase time in the hospital, require additional care, and may result in permanent disability.
For January 2020-November 2020, Dell children’s average rate for falls with moderate or greater injuries is .00, compared to an average of .024 for the Solutions for Patient Safety children’s hospitals. Dell Children’s is performing better than the comparison group.
This number represents the number of times patients experienced falls that resulted in stitches, splinting, muscle strain, surgery, fractures requiring casting, skull fractures, bleeding in the skull, internal injury, or died as a result of a fall per 1000 patients days. A patient day is counted each day a patient is in the hospital, for each patient in the hospital, for the duration of their hospital stay. One patient in the hospital for 15 days would equal 15 patient days.